Best website builder for makers, sellers and doers.

Unlike other sites, e-commerce sites also require alterations and demand to have something easy. Among all these WordPress alternatives, Shopify is the best alternative to WordPress in this regard. It is simple and helps in growing your business the easy way. It is user-friendly and assists entrepreneurs in focusing on their products and promotions. It is easy to manipulate and offer varied kinds of themes. The added advantage of Shopify is that it integrates with social media which helps in selling the products on these social networking sites. As it is meant for e-commerce websites it is integrated with PayPal and can use it for simple and easier transactions. It helps in displaying an unlimited number of items as it has unlimited disk space. It also has advance shipping options and discount codes available.


I am a Blogger to Joomla to WordPress user and I can definitely say that WordPress is the Big Boss of the lot. I am a web designer who started with HTML and no PHP knowledge, but got hooked to WordPress due to its ease of use and simple learning curve. Even a novice with basic knowledge of html and php can find it easy to adapt quickly to WordPress. I am here to stay with WordPress 🙂
Choosing the CMS to start a blog or a website development project is a big decision, particularly if you aren’t going with WordPress. You’ll need to meticulously research different interface options, what add-ons and extensions are offered, coding capabilities, and layout templates. However, as we have seen, there are plenty of WordPress alternatives out there to try before you make your final decision.
Choosing the CMS to start a blog or a website development project is a big decision, particularly if you aren’t going with WordPress. You’ll need to meticulously research different interface options, what add-ons and extensions are offered, coding capabilities, and layout templates. However, as we have seen, there are plenty of WordPress alternatives out there to try before you make your final decision.
In a nutshell, when it comes to WordPress it is an all in one platform which helps in creating a website, blogs and manage content. It has its advantages and disadvantages. When it comes to specific projects or sites which are to be created it may have pluses and minuses. It depends on the project, user and his requirements and strategies which define which application is to be used. There are many WordPress alternatives with different features.
[WordPress Alternative] Best Website Builder for Professionals

It is also much more flexible and extensible than WordPress. The best part is also that unlike WordPress with predefined content type, it allows the user to set up their own content type using 18 different types of field. But like we mentioned before, this is not the perfect place to start if you are looking for a simplistic website and are a beginner.


Many companies moved or started their blog on the Medium platform. The lucky ones among them could still publish on their own sub-domain name. But that suddenly changed a while back: now you have to publish on the Medium.com domain, which is a terrible idea if SEO is important to you. Also you get annoying mobile pop-ups pushing you into installing the Medium app.
I don’t think you are being fair. The average small blogger on a shared host isn’t going to be an expert in PHP. Like the poster I have seen 4 wordpress sites hacked and have just switched hosts following 2 in a year. One of these did use an outdated commercial template, the other 3 used standard templates with no plugins supposedly automatically updated at every new release.. There are plenty of simple things that could be done to make WordPress more secure including the most simple one of notifying any changes to configuration files via basic checksum. PHP as a product may be very secure but the way it is implemented by shared hosts allows for multiple infections. Security and ease of maintenance should be number one on the list when looking for a blog if you don’t want to be monitoring round the clock. I’m looking for a simple occasional blog that I can configure without a computer science degree and hopefully tweak by looking through the code. Ghost seems interesting but my host doesn’t support NodeJS

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Joomla is the second-most popular content management system behind WordPress. Similar to WP, it can be used to build a variety of websites and applications for businesses, schools, non-profits, online stores, and so much more. Because Joomla doesn’t offer a paid option like WP and is geared towards a more experienced user, your only means of support is searching through their forums and developer communities for help.
All that being said, October’s gets pretty rough the closer you look. The community isn’t deep or broad enough to support a wide enough range of prebuilt plugins or themes, and to make that worse the October crew has set up a weird cloud-based “project” validation thing, in the interest of being security conscious I believe. Regardless of the intent, it makes it super-difficult for newbies to figure out how add, update, or edit any of the plugins on their site. And heaven help you if you decide to ‘detach’ your site from a project … ::sigh::
Hi Gina, Thanks for your comment and sharing your thoughts. Hiring an expert developer is always good, but it does have its challenges. Financial investment is just one of them. It's not a big problem if a company is well established already and is cash flowing to re-invest its profits into technology. But not all companies have that level of budget to commit, and not all companies are well established (yet). A lot of users are just starting out and just don't have that level of resource to get their websites off the ground. In such circumstance, I think our list above makes a lot of sense. No doubt, your comment is also valid, but I think that's more applicable for well established businesses. We have a full discussion of the cost of building a website that compares the cost of hiring a developer versus using a DIY website builder such as the ones I suggested above. I also wrote an article about the idea of hiring a designer / developer - when it's appropriate, and when it isn't appropriate. It's just my own view and what I would advise my friends and family if they were to ask me. Of course, every single person that's looking to build a website has different needs, motivations and resources. Thanks for adding to this discussion! Jeremy
Joomla is the second-most popular content management system behind WordPress. Similar to WP, it can be used to build a variety of websites and applications for businesses, schools, non-profits, online stores, and so much more. Because Joomla doesn’t offer a paid option like WP and is geared towards a more experienced user, your only means of support is searching through their forums and developer communities for help.
Amongst most of the website builders, another name that comes to mind is Squarespace. The versatile builder for blogs, portfolio sites as well as online stores, has managed to rise in its popularity in the recent years. Despite the huge difference, this being a closed source software while WordPress is an open source; it certainly is a great alternative to WordPress Page builder. That’s right, for the casual users the overall functionality and the flexibility is the main aspect.
I’ve made some use of Kirby CMS. It’s a really well put together flat file CMS. It takes some coding out of the box to get it set up as desired, but then it’s a pleasure to use. Advantages of not having a database include simpler setup, and the ease of version control of the whole site. Statamic is a similar option, though I’ve not spent any significant time using it.
If you’re knowledgeable about site building and e-commerce, you’ll find solutions on this list that give you better extension possibilities, more overall features, and the freedom to potentially do anything you want with your online store (since you’d be hosting it on your own server). That said, if you’re just getting into selling things online and want to do everything yourself, Shopify can often be a great place to start for new businesses and less technically-savvy folk!
Shopify offers a 14-day free trial, giving you access to all of its world class sales tools and features before you spend a cent. To keep using the platform, you’ll need to upgrade to one of the three plans available, which cost between $29 and $299 per month. The highest plan is only recommended for companies with monthly revenues of more than $10,000.
Best Alternative to GoDaddy WordPress Hosting [Top Choice]
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